Telos 170 · Spring 2015
Security and Liberalism

Telos 170 takes up the debate of the relation between liberalism and security from the perspectives of different disciplines, including literary studies, intellectual history, political theory, international relations, and sociology. The purpose of this interdisciplinary exchange is to provide a view of the scope of liberalism and security that extends beyond the current narrow debate of surveillance and the war on terror.
Read Russell A. Berman and Johannes Voelz's introduction to Telos 170 here.
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The New Class Conflict
by Joel Kotkin

In ways not seen since the Gilded Age of the late nineteenth century, America is becoming a nation of increasingly sharply divided classes. Joel Kotkin’s The New Class Conflict shows how the rise of a high-tech oligarchy, along with academia, the media, and the government bureaucracy, is creating a new class order, largely at the expense of the middle class.
Germany and Iran:
From the Aryan Axis to the Nuclear Threshold
by Matthias Küntzel

Matthias Küntzel’s Germany and Iran examines the history of the special relationship between Germany and the Islamic Republic of Iran, from its origins at the start of the last century to the ongoing controversy over Iran’s nuclear program. Drawing on new archival findings from Washington, DC, and Berlin, Küntzel traces the underpinnings of that relationship, which has survived every war, catastrophe, and revolution.

 
The Forest Passage
by Ernst Jünger

Ernst Jünger’s The Forest Passage explores the possibility of resistance: how the independent thinker can withstand and oppose the power of the omnipresent state. No matter how extensive the technologies of surveillance become, the forest can shelter the rebel, and the rebel can strike back against tyranny. Jünger’s manifesto is a defense of freedom against the pressure to conform to political manipulation and artificial consensus.
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Transnational History as Historical Subject

By Richard R. Weiner

Transnational history has emerged in the wake of the sprouting of international history, global history, and post-colonial history as historical subject fields in the 1990s academic marketplace. Chris Bayly’s 2004 book Birth of the Modern World, 1780–1914 is a landmark in the emergence of transnational history as an academic subject stressing the connectedness of history, as a narrative of accelerating . . . (continue reading)

Roundtable: The Future of History

By Telos Press

From the 2015 Telos Conference in New York, the following is a video of the roundtable discussion on "The Future of History: A New Universal Vision or Dissolving into Particularities?" Moderated by Adrian Pabst, the roundtable included Wayne Hudson, Joseph Bendersky, Greg Melleuish, Aryeh Botwinick, Jonathan Israel, and Tim Luke. The video of an earlier roundtable on "Universal History" can . . . (continue reading)

The Critique of Philosophical Naturalism

By Lukas Szrot

Given the rich and diverse history in the discipline of philosophy, many a practicing philosopher might justifiably remark that insightful philosophical inquiry must withstand the test of time. Though “The Collapse of Philosophical Naturalism” was published in Telos in 1969, many of its insights remain highly relevant to conversations that continue in philosophical and sociopolitical circles today. Dale Riepe issues . . . (continue reading)

From the Publisher's Desk

Telos has always celebrated rejuvenation and renewal, and in recent years we’ve embraced that change in a variety of ways. We’ve taken Telos online and digitized our full forty-four year archive, allowing institutional subscribers from around the world to access the journal over the Internet. We’ve created a regular conference series in New York City and another more recently in Europe, which have brought together an increasing number of scholars to discuss today’s critical issues in politics and philosophy . . . (continue reading)

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