The Incongruities of Asymmetric War

Assessing asymmetric wars in the abstract is a problematic task, even though most are “small wars” fought by “big nations.” Armed conflicts with these characteristics brim with persistent, undeclared, and low-intensity violence. It rarely is extinguished, and the lingering injuries sustain even more violence on the same scale. Many of these small wars began in Asia, Africa, Latin America, or the Middle East during, or not long after, World War II. Armed resistance there never completely ended; instead it intensified with decolonization and/or postcolonial state failure. Now virtually institutionalized in many violent wild zones around the world, low-intensity wars also flare up as asymmetric conflicts between rich countries and poor peoples, Westernized nations and anti-Western movements, liberal democratic states and illiberal theocratic insurgents after 1989.

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David Pan on Upcoming Telos-Paul Piccone Institute Research Projects and Conferences

Speaking at the 2017 Telos Conference in New York, David Pan, Executive Director of the Telos-Paul Piccone Institute, discussed some of the Institute’s upcoming research projects and conferences, which will explore the topics of asymmetrical warfare and constitutional theory.

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The 2017 Telos Conference in New York: Kenneth Anderson on Asymmetrical Warfare in the Post–New World Order World

At the 2017 Telos-Paul Piccone Institute Conference, held this past weekend in New York City, Kenneth Anderson delivered a keynote address entitled “Situating Asymmetrical Warfare among Forms of Emerging Conflict in the Post–New World Order World.” We are delighted to present the full video of the address here.

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The Ambiguity of Sacrifice in a Post-Heroic Nation: A Military Perspective

Most people think that the military is all about killing other people. I, on the contrary, follow van Creveld. He states that serving in the military means more to be prepared and willing to risk one’s life then to endanger other lives. You could argue that military technology provides tools that have kinetic effects over huge distances without any risk for one’s personnel. Drones, for example, are such weapons. However, can you win a war with only drones? We have relearned the lesson that it takes “boots on the ground” to win “the better peace,” as Clausewitz carefully worded it. It takes soldiers on the ground to control an area, to protect the population, to de-escalate a situation, and to win hearts and minds.

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