Telos 179 · Summer 2017
A New Regime?

We may very well be entering a different political era, a new regime, and not only in the United States. How can Critical Theory describe it effectively? Telos 179 brings together an array of political, cultural, and theoretical analyses, each of which responds to this challenge.
Read Russell A. Berman's introduction to Telos 179 here.

Mastering the Past:
Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe
and the Rise of Illiberalism
by Ellen Hinsey

Through a series of eyewitness reports, Ellen Hinsey's Mastering the Past documents a critical shift in the Central and Eastern European political landscape: the rise of illiberalism. Available March 1.
Free Radicals:
Agitators, Hippies, Urban Guerrillas, and Germany’s
Youth Revolt of the 1960s and 1970s
by Elliot Neaman
With a Foreword by Timothy W. Luke

Elliot Neaman's Free Radicals presents a comprehensive panorama of the West German youth revolt in the 1960s,
as well as its subsequent fragmentation and descent into
terrorism in the 1970s.
Land and Sea:
A World-Historical Meditation
by Carl Schmitt

Translated by Samuel Garrett Zeitlin
Edited and with Introductions by
Russell A. Berman and Samuel Garrett Zeitlin

Now available in a richly annotated English translation, Carl Schmitt’s Land and Sea outlines Schmitt’s views of world history, geopolitics, warfare, and the politics of space.
Sturm
by Ernst Jünger

Translated by Alexis P. Walker
With an Introduction by David Pan

Set in 1916 in the days before the Somme offensive, Ernst Jünger's World War I novella Sturm provides a vivid portrait of the front-line experiences of four German infantry officers and their company. Now available for the first time in English translation, Sturm tells a powerful story of war and its effects on the lives of the men who endure it.
Eumeswil
by Ernst Jünger

Translated by Joachim Neugroschel
With an Introduction by Russell A. Berman

Ernst Jünger's Eumeswil, a brilliant dystopian novel set in a totalitarian city-state in a post-apocalyptic future, presents a comprehensive synthesis of Jünger’s mature thought, with a special emphasis on the possibilities for individual freedom in a technologically monitored postmodern world.
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The Rise of the Illiberal Elites

By Ellen Hinsey

In the wake of the Brexit vote and the 2016 American presidential election, the idea began to circulate that we were witnessing a trans-Atlantic, populist "revolt against the elites," which had spontaneously arisen from populations whose concerns had, for too long, gone unheard by those in power. Longstanding economic problems regarding income disparity and wealth—left unaddressed by both sides of . . . (continue reading)

Three Forms of Democratic Political Acclamation

By Mitchell Dean

This paper takes its initial inspiration from Carl Schmitt's claim in 1927 that the "original democratic phenomenon . . . is acclamation," and draws upon the interchange between religious and political forms of acclamation observed by Ernst Hartwig Kantorowicz and Erik Peterson and elaborated recently by Giorgio Agamben. If Schmitt is correct, then acclamation is central to the construction of "the people" . . . (continue reading)

Values, Virtues, and the Language of Morality

By Flaminia Incecchi

In "Values or Virtues, Nietzsche or Aristotle?" Jay Gupta outlines the way that value discourse stifles normative intention and the ethical imagination. The aim of the paper is to "suggest that the language of values disguises a deeper, normatively richer language of virtue, and . . . point[s] to the importance of recovering that language in the modern age, as well as the . . . (continue reading)

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